Hinduism’s Ethical Restraints


Lesson of the Day

From The Master Course by Satguru Sivaya Subramuniyaswami

What Are the Ten Classical Restraints?

Hinduism’s ethical restraints are contained in ten simple precepts called yamas. They define the codes of conduct by which we harness our instinctive forces and cultivate the innate, pristine qualities of our soul. Aum.

Bhashya
The yamas and niyamas are scriptural injunctions for all aspects of thought and behavior. They are advice and simple guidelines, not commandments. The ten yamas, defining the ideals of charya, are: 1) ahimsa, “noninjury,” do not harm others by thought, word or deed; 2) satya, “truthfulness,” refrain from lying and betraying promises; 3) asteya, “nonstealing,” neither steal nor covet nor enter into debt; 4) brahmacharya, “divine conduct,” control lust by remaining celibate when single, leading to faithfulness in marriage; 5) kshama, “patience,” restrain intolerance with people and impatience with circumstances; 6) dhriti, “steadfastness,” overcome nonperseverance, fear, indecision and changeableness; 7) daya, “compassion,” conquer callous, cruel and insensitive feelings toward all beings; 8) arjava, “honesty,” renounce deception and wrongdoing; 9) mitahara, “moderate appetite,” neither eat too much, nor consume meat, fish, fowl or eggs; 10) shaucha, “purity,” avoid impurity in body, mind and speech. The Vedas proclaim, “To them belongs yon stainless Brahma world in whom there is no crookedness and falsehood, nor trickery.” Aum Namah Sivaya.

Lesson 219 from Living with Siva
The Psychic Ties of Intimacy

Adultery is in the news today, not only in national but also international scandals. Television plots give permission for “sneaking around.” It is not uncommon, and many don’t give it a thought, for husbands to visit “ladies of pleasure” and pay for their services during their wife’s monthly retreat or many months of pregnancy–and, of course, on business trips. Yes, those business trips!

The South Indian ethical masterpiece, Tirukural, advises, “Among those who stand outside virtue, there is no greater fool than he who stands with a lustful heart outside another’s gate. Hatred, sin, fear and disgrace–these four will never abandon one who commits adultery” (142, 146). …please click here to read more